Camera Angles

Eye – Level angle

This is the most common view, being the real-world angle that we are all used to. It shows subjects as we would expect to see them in real life. It is a fairly neutral shot.

Low angle

This is a shot where the camera is located below the subject matter. This increases height and power of the subject making it superior.

High angle

A shot where the camera is located above the subject and films down on it. This gives a general overview of the scene and also takes any power away from the subject making it insignificant.

Canted angle

This shot is achieved by tilting the camera off to the side so that the shot is composed with vertical lines at an angle to the side of the frame. Many are static shots, but in a moving shot the camera can pivot, pan or track along the director/cinematographer’s established diagonal axis for the shot.

Slanted OR Dutch tilt angle

Also known as a dutch tilt, this is where the camera is purposely tilted to one side so the horizon is on an angle. This creates an interesting and dramatic effect. Famous examples include Carol Reed’s The Third Man, Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane and the Batman series.

Dutch tilts are also popular in MTV-style video production, where unusual angles and lots of camera movement play a big part.

Bird’s Eye angle

The scene is shown from directly above. This is a completely different and somewhat unnatural point of view which can be used for dramatic effect or for showing a different spatial perspective.

In drama it can be used to show the positions and motions of different characters and objects, enabling the viewer to see things the characters can’t.

The bird’s-eye view is also very useful in sports, documentaries, etc.

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